uk.sci.weather (UK Weather) (uk.sci.weather) For the discussion of daily weather events, chiefly affecting the UK and adjacent parts of Europe, both past and predicted. The discussion is open to all, but contributions on a practical scientific level are encouraged.

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Old June 9th 18, 03:40 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Definition of 'mild'

Reference the recent thread on the use of 'mild' in forecasts in June
(which I seem to have lost from my laptop) I have had a response from
the Met Office confirming that strict definitions still apply to such
terms.

During the winter (defined for this purpose as mid-Nov to mid-Mar) a
temperature 2-3 degrees above average is described as 'mild'. A similar
departure from average during summer (mid-May to mid-Sep) is described
as 'warm'. In spring (mid-Mar to mid-May) and autumn (mid-Sep to
mid-Nov) a temperature 2-3 deg above average is described as 'rather
warm'.

The above confirms that the use of 'mild' in several forecasts during
the past week was incorrect as that term, by definition, is used only
during the period mid-Nov to mid-Mar. Whatever happened to quality
control.

When I get back to my office computer next week I'll put the whole
table of definitions onto Dropbox and post a link to it here.

Norman

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Old June 11th 18, 01:42 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Definition of 'mild'

Norman Lynagh wrote:

Reference the recent thread on the use of 'mild' in forecasts in June
(which I seem to have lost from my laptop) I have had a response from
the Met Office confirming that strict definitions still apply to such
terms.

During the winter (defined for this purpose as mid-Nov to mid-Mar) a
temperature 2-3 degrees above average is described as 'mild'. A
similar departure from average during summer (mid-May to mid-Sep) is
described as 'warm'. In spring (mid-Mar to mid-May) and autumn
(mid-Sep to mid-Nov) a temperature 2-3 deg above average is described
as 'rather warm'.

The above confirms that the use of 'mild' in several forecasts during
the past week was incorrect as that term, by definition, is used only
during the period mid-Nov to mid-Mar. Whatever happened to quality
control.

When I get back to my office computer next week I'll put the whole
table of definitions onto Dropbox and post a link to it here.

Norman



The Met Office temperature anomaly definitions are at

https://db.tt/ujK3EJKsN9

--
Norman Lynagh
Tideswell, Derbyshire
303m a.s.l.
https://peakdistrictweather.org
Twitter: @TideswellWeathr
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Old June 12th 18, 10:58 AM posted to uk.sci.weather
Len Len is offline
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Default Definition of 'mild'

On Monday, June 11, 2018 at 2:42:38 PM UTC+1, Norman Lynagh wrote:
Norman Lynagh wrote:

Reference the recent thread on the use of 'mild' in forecasts in June
(which I seem to have lost from my laptop) I have had a response from
the Met Office confirming that strict definitions still apply to such
terms.

During the winter (defined for this purpose as mid-Nov to mid-Mar) a
temperature 2-3 degrees above average is described as 'mild'. A
similar departure from average during summer (mid-May to mid-Sep) is
described as 'warm'. In spring (mid-Mar to mid-May) and autumn
(mid-Sep to mid-Nov) a temperature 2-3 deg above average is described
as 'rather warm'.

The above confirms that the use of 'mild' in several forecasts during
the past week was incorrect as that term, by definition, is used only
during the period mid-Nov to mid-Mar. Whatever happened to quality
control.

When I get back to my office computer next week I'll put the whole
table of definitions onto Dropbox and post a link to it here.

Norman



The Met Office temperature anomaly definitions are at

https://db.tt/ujK3EJKsN9

--
Norman Lynagh
Tideswell, Derbyshire
303m a.s.l.
https://peakdistrictweather.org
Twitter: @TideswellWeathr


And Tomasz Shaffer mentioned cheeky thunderstorms and cool fronts
in yesterday evening's forecast.

Len
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Old June 12th 18, 04:13 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Posts: 4,099
Default Definition of 'mild'

On Tuesday, 12 June 2018 11:58:33 UTC+1, Len wrote:
On Monday, June 11, 2018 at 2:42:38 PM UTC+1, Norman Lynagh wrote:
Norman Lynagh wrote:

Reference the recent thread on the use of 'mild' in forecasts in June
(which I seem to have lost from my laptop) I have had a response from
the Met Office confirming that strict definitions still apply to such
terms.

During the winter (defined for this purpose as mid-Nov to mid-Mar) a
temperature 2-3 degrees above average is described as 'mild'. A
similar departure from average during summer (mid-May to mid-Sep) is
described as 'warm'. In spring (mid-Mar to mid-May) and autumn
(mid-Sep to mid-Nov) a temperature 2-3 deg above average is described
as 'rather warm'.

The above confirms that the use of 'mild' in several forecasts during
the past week was incorrect as that term, by definition, is used only
during the period mid-Nov to mid-Mar. Whatever happened to quality
control.

When I get back to my office computer next week I'll put the whole
table of definitions onto Dropbox and post a link to it here.

Norman



The Met Office temperature anomaly definitions are at

https://db.tt/ujK3EJKsN9

--
Norman Lynagh
Tideswell, Derbyshire
303m a.s.l.
https://peakdistrictweather.org
Twitter: @TideswellWeathr


And Tomasz Shaffer mentioned cheeky thunderstorms and cool fronts
in yesterday evening's forecast.

Len


Weather as entertainment. What a contrast with the Beeb's attitude to the news.

Tudor Hughes


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