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Old May 10th 09, 06:21 AM posted to sci.environment,sci.physics,alt.culture.alaska,sci.geo.meteorology
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Default Day K??*10^3 - The Sun is inactive - Pandemic Flu Could Sicken One-Third of Global Population

"2009-05-09 07:25:51 U.T."

The visible face of the Sun is without blemish:
http://web.ct.astro.it/sun/solef.jpg

Please visit:
http://blog.nj.com/southjersey_impac...SolarCycle.jpg

The right panel shows the visible face of the Sun as it looked on a good day
during the late Modern Warm Period. Sunspots are the apparent size of
craters on the moon. The left panel shows a Sun as it appears today.

Please write to Al Gore so that Al knows that the Sun is not living up to
his religious expectations. Al Gore is a divinity school dropout. George
Carlin had a better grasp of the true nature of God's creation, than does Al
Gore.

Please visit:
http://www.co-intelligence.org/newsl...es/sun-etc.jpg
which shows the relative sizes of the Sun and planets. Compared to the Sun,
Jupiter is the size of a pea, earth is the size of a grain of sand.

Pandemic Flu Could Sicken One-Third of Global Population

GENEVA, Switzerland, May 7, 2009 (ENS) - The new influenza A/H1N1 could
infect a third of the world's population, a top World Health Organization
official said today.

At the agency's daily update in Geneva, WHO Assistant Director-General Keiji
Fukuda told reporters on a teleconference, "If the outbreak were to hit
pandemic proportions, it would be reasonable to estimate a third of the
world's population would be infected."

The world's population now stands at 6.778 billion, according to the U.S.
Census Bureau's World Population Clock, which means that if one-third of the
population were infected today, 2.259 billion people would be sick.

But Fukuda said it is too early to tell how many of those affected by an
H1N1 pandemic would die. "You can't make those projections until you see
what proportion of the population gets seriously sick, what proportion of
ill people die. Our understanding is evolving, it's very premature to make
those projections," he said.

Fukuda said that today the World Health Organization is leaving its
international pandemic alert at phase 5, on a six-level warning scale,
because the disease is still spreading in just one region - North America.

According to WHO data, the number of laboratory confirmed cases today rose
to 2,371 in 24 countries, with 44 deaths.

Mexico still has the widest outbreak, confirming 1,112 cases and 42 deaths.

The following countries have reported laboratory confirmed cases with no
deaths - Austria (1), Canada (201), China, Hong Kong (1), Colombia (1),
Costa Rica (1), Denmark (1), El Salvador (2), France (5), Germany (10),
Guatemala (1), Ireland (1), Israel (6), Italy (5), Netherlands (2), New
Zealand (5), Poland (1), Portugal (1), South Korea (3), Spain (81), Sweden
(1), Switzerland (1) and the United Kingdom (32).

There is no evidence that the virus is gaining a foothold and spreading
through communities in the UK or Spain, which have maintained the status quo
over the last few days, Fukuda said.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in the United States today
reported 1,823 probable and confirmed cases in 44 states with two deaths, an
increase of around 330 cases over yesterday.

"We are reporting 896 confirmed cases in 43 states, that's an increase of
254 cases and around 925 probable cases," said Dr. Richard Besser, acting
director of the CDC. "Again, I want to reiterate that as soon as I say the
numbers, they're wrong because ongoing testing is taking place at CDC, it
takes place in every state," he told reporters on a briefing call.

"Median age remains 15. The range is one month to 87 years and 12 of the
cases are under age one," said Dr. Besser. "So I do want to remind you that
individuals of all ages can acquire this virus. Only about 10 percent of
confirmed cases have a travel history from Mexico. This indicates as well
ongoing transmission in communities."

Health officials in Texas Tuesday confirmed the first death of a U.S.
resident from H1N1 flu in a woman in Cameron County, on the U.S.-Mexico
border. The woman, who has not been identified, had other chronic health
problems, said officials with the Texas Department of State Health.

Last week, a toddler from Mexico City visiting family in Texas died in a
Houston hospital, the first such flu death in the United States.

Dr. Besser said the CDC expects that more cases, more hospitalizations and
more deaths from this outbreak will occur over the coming days and weeks. "I
expect that as we see more cases in more places, as we see more severe cases
that we will see more deaths in this country," he said today.

In Geneva, Fukuda told reporters, "We're very careful to say we expect the
situation to evolve and we're not quite sure how it will evolve. We have
seen pandemics cause huge numbers of deaths. In the 1918 pandemic, at least
20 million people died in one year from that infection. It started mild in
the spring and over several months became a severe illness."

"We're jumping so hard on this new virus because if it stays mild, that's
great," said Fukuda, "but if it turns severe, that is something we have to
know about."

When the Southern Hemisphere goes into winter time, Fukuda explained,
typically we see and increase in activity for flu viruses. Also the
population in the Southern Hemisphere is different from that in the Northern
Hemisphere. The younger population in large developing countries amd regions
may be more vulnerable due to malnourishment, war, and conditons like HIV
infections, he said.

"In the past, we have seen that when seasonal flu hits these populations,
what was mild in the industrialized world has been devastating to developing
world," he said.

"Pandemics don't develop quickly," Fukuda warned. "This will develop over
months and years."

The World Health Organization is taking this time to work with countries to
help the be as prepared as possible for a potential pandemic. Fukuda said,
"There are things countries can do, and we can help them to prevent people
from getting sick if the virus turns more virulent and occurs in many
places."

A vaccine against the A/H1N1 influenza could be ready in four to six months,
and meanwhile, said Fukuda, there are several lines of defense.

"When you are facing a new disease threat, the most important thing is to
give people information, especially in the beginning," he said. Other
measures that can be taken without drugs such as personal hygiene, washing
hands - these steps can be taken by any country. Isolation and quarantine
can be very helpful."

Then there are anti-viral drugs and hospitalization if people require
ventilation. Manufacturers' capacity to make anti-viral drugs has increased
a great deal, Fukuda said.

Officials with WHO, the U.S., Canadian and Mexican governments all stated
today that pork is clean and eating properly cooked pork from healthy
animals does not transmit influenza A/H1N1, although it has been nicknamed
swine flu.

In the municipality of Zamora, at a medical clinic, Mexican President Felipe
Calderon ate carnitas, a typical Michoacan dish, accompanied by Michoacan
Governor Leonel Godoy, the Secretary of Agriculture Alberto Cardenas,
Environment Secretary Rafael Elvira, and the reporters covering their
activities to show that eating pork poses no risk to health.

"We are going to eat carnitas, not only because they taste good but to show
that eating pork is not risky," said Calderon. "The only risk would be if we
eliminated a productive activity that provides income and work for many
people in Michoacan and the rest of the country," he said.

After the closure of most public places and government offices over the
Cinco de Mayo holiday, Mexico is now slowly reopening schools and offices.
The president stressed that one of the key aspects of resuming normal
activities is to encourage a greater culture of prevention among Mexicans.

"What we must do is not stay cooped up in our homes all day, because that is
not possible because life must go on, but what we must do is to increase
preventive actions in our everyday lives," he said.

WHO is not recommending any travel or trade restrictions related to the
A/H1N1 outbreak. The U.S. State Department is advising people not to plan
non-essential travel to Mexico.




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Old May 10th 09, 08:03 AM posted to sci.environment,sci.physics,alt.culture.alaska,sci.geo.meteorology
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Default Day K??*10^3 - The Sun is inactive - Pandemic Flu Could Sicken One-Third of Global Population

On Sun, 10 May 2009 05:21:23 GMT, "Edmund Fitzgerald"
wrote:

"2009-05-09 07:25:51 U.T."

The visible face of the Sun is without blemish:
http://web.ct.astro.it/sun/solef.jpg


not soo...
http://www.spaceweather.com/images20...fg2alrph brg6

Look at left hand side.. 20 degrees above the equator..



P.S. For an object that radiates 16 Million watts of energy per
square meter. I would never call.. SOL ...INactive..

The area's which emitted a large CME a couple of days ago are now just
rotating into view.

http://www.spaceweather.com/images20... lfg2alrphbrg6


  #3   Report Post  
Old May 10th 09, 08:12 AM posted to sci.environment,sci.physics,alt.culture.alaska,sci.geo.meteorology
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First recorded activity by Weather-Banter: Feb 2008
Posts: 107
Default Day K??*10^3 - The Sun is inactive - Pandemic Flu Could Sicken One-Third of Global Population

On Sun, 10 May 2009 03:03:55 -0400, T. Keating
wrote:

On Sun, 10 May 2009 05:21:23 GMT, "Edmund Fitzgerald"
wrote:

"2009-05-09 07:25:51 U.T."

The visible face of the Sun is without blemish:
http://web.ct.astro.it/sun/solef.jpg


not soo...
http://www.spaceweather.com/images20...fg2alrph brg6

Look at left hand side.. 20 degrees above the equator..



P.S. For an object that radiates 16 Million watts of energy per
square meter. I would never call.. SOL ...INactive..


Minor correction.. SOL radiates ~64 Million watts of energy per square
meter.. (I incorrectly used 1.391e+6km (SOL diameter) as these
radius.)


The area's which emitted a large CME a couple of days ago are now just
rotating into view.

http://www.spaceweather.com/images20... lfg2alrphbrg6




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