uk.sci.weather (UK Weather) (uk.sci.weather) For the discussion of daily weather events, chiefly affecting the UK and adjacent parts of Europe, both past and predicted. The discussion is open to all, but contributions on a practical scientific level are encouraged.

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Old February 27th 04, 10:47 AM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Convergence Zone

Easily discernable from SW of IoM through W Wales and far SW Cornwall -
http://www.avbrief.com/newcharts//20...5_lradar_0.gif

However this isn't picked up on the GFS 18z DT T+18
http://weather.ou.edu/~oscarvdv/maps...etae_eur18.png

Maybe off shore breezes from Ireland and Wales ?

Joe



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Old February 27th 04, 12:16 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Convergence Zone

Joe Hunt wrote:
Easily discernable from SW of IoM through W Wales and far SW Cornwall -
http://www.avbrief.com/newcharts//20...5_lradar_0.gif

However this isn't picked up on the GFS 18z DT T+18
http://weather.ou.edu/~oscarvdv/maps...etae_eur18.png

Maybe off shore breezes from Ireland and Wales ?

Joe



-yes I have been watching that feature too. It has been there on and off
for over 2 days now. When viewing the radar animations it is also
appears that the gap between Northern Ireland and Scotland allows
convection cells to get through whilst those that track over land die
out. A quite distinct streamer of showers that miss the land and make it
through can be observed.

I also wonder if surface roughness variations between the land and the
sea are causing convergence from air running parallel to the coastline
(or here the IoM) which could further enhance the development of the
feature...

Looking at yesterdays radar sequence:

http://www.bbc.co.uk/weather/live/brradar.shtml

at about 0900 Thursday, the same feature is present, but then becomes
rotated cyclonically as it becomes wrapped up in the development over SW
England during the afternoon.

Steve



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Old February 27th 04, 08:07 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Convergence Zone

Easily discernable from SW of IoM through W Wales and far SW Cornwall -
http://www.avbrief.com/newcharts//20...5_lradar_0.gif

However this isn't picked up on the GFS 18z DT T+18
http://weather.ou.edu/~oscarvdv/maps...etae_eur18.png

Maybe off shore breezes from Ireland and Wales ?

Joe

Interestingly there's a clear arc between the band and the Welsh coast here-
http://www.sat.dundee.ac.uk/abin/pro...roject.ch2.jpg
or is it coincidence?
However ,I thought bands in the N Channel were due to topographic forcing convergence forced by the
N Irish and west highland mountains and coast,

--
regards,
david
(add 17 to waghorne to reply)


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Old February 27th 04, 09:53 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Convergence Zone


================================================== ==================
This posting expresses the personal view and opinions of the author.
Something which everyone on this planet should be able to do.
================================================== ==================

Hi Joe et al,

I prefer to think pragmatically on this one.
My explanation is that the wind direction is such that the air picks up most
moisture in a narrow region from the North Channel southwards due to the longest
sea track. This moisture then provides the impetus for showers which stream
south diverging only slightly due to straight laminar flow. Very similar to dye
being injected into a fluid. If you looked at satellite imagery today you would
have seen the source of the cumulus cloud trail in the North Channel and cloud
free areas to the south of Ireland demonstrating that the air needs a longish
sea track to pick up enough moisture to form cloud and then showers. Convergence
may also have some role as air is squeezed between Scotland and Ireland but I do
not think it is the whole cause.

Cheers,

Will.
--

" A cup is most useful when empty "
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------
A COL BH site in East Dartmoor at Haytor, Devon 310m asl (1017 feet).

mailto:
www:
http://www.lyneside.demon.co.uk

DISCLAIMER - All views and opinions expressed by myself are personal
and do not necessarily represent those of my employer.
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Joe Hunt wrote in message ...
Easily discernable from SW of IoM through W Wales and far SW Cornwall -
http://www.avbrief.com/newcharts//20...5_lradar_0.gif

However this isn't picked up on the GFS 18z DT T+18
http://weather.ou.edu/~oscarvdv/maps...etae_eur18.png

Maybe off shore breezes from Ireland and Wales ?

Joe




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Old February 28th 04, 08:26 AM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Convergence Zone

I prefer to think pragmatically on this one.
........the impetus for showers which stream
south diverging only slightly due to straight laminar flow. Very similar to dye
being injected into a fluid. ......Cheers,Will.
A neat picture of it Will,I spose you might think of the topography as acting as a sort of nozzle
then,

--
regards,
david
(add 17 to waghorne to reply)

--




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Old February 28th 04, 08:48 AM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Posts: 935
Default Convergence Zone

I agree Will. It's common for the tip of Cornwall to get caught in these
conditions. Sometimes the line of preciptitation which runs virtually
straight N-S to the tip of Cornwall seems to swirl around Land's End, as if
Cornwall is disrupting the flow..


Graham

"Will" wrote in message
...

================================================== ==================
This posting expresses the personal view and opinions of the author.
Something which everyone on this planet should be able to do.
================================================== ==================

Hi Joe et al,

I prefer to think pragmatically on this one.
My explanation is that the wind direction is such that the air picks up

most
moisture in a narrow region from the North Channel southwards due to the

longest
sea track. This moisture then provides the impetus for showers which

stream
south diverging only slightly due to straight laminar flow. Very similar

to dye
being injected into a fluid. If you looked at satellite imagery today you

would
have seen the source of the cumulus cloud trail in the North Channel and

cloud
free areas to the south of Ireland demonstrating that the air needs a

longish
sea track to pick up enough moisture to form cloud and then showers.

Convergence
may also have some role as air is squeezed between Scotland and Ireland

but I do
not think it is the whole cause.

Cheers,

Will.
--

" A cup is most useful when empty "
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----
A COL BH site in East Dartmoor at Haytor, Devon 310m asl (1017 feet).

mailto:
www:
http://www.lyneside.demon.co.uk

DISCLAIMER - All views and opinions expressed by myself are personal
and do not necessarily represent those of my employer.
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

-----

Joe Hunt wrote in message ...
Easily discernable from SW of IoM through W Wales and far SW Cornwall -
http://www.avbrief.com/newcharts//20...5_lradar_0.gif

However this isn't picked up on the GFS 18z DT T+18
http://weather.ou.edu/~oscarvdv/maps...etae_eur18.png

Maybe off shore breezes from Ireland and Wales ?

Joe








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