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Old October 12th 17, 04:29 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

To the casual viewer, the map recently issued by the Met Office showing the
yellow warning area for wind on Monday could be very misleading. It appears to
show that the area affected is only a narrow swathe extending northwards from
Cornwall through the Irish Sea to western Scotland. The area includes extensive
areas of sea, including Republic of Ireland territorial waters in the Irish Sea
but excludes much of the Celtic Sea. Some land areas in the Republic of Ireland
are included. The warning area stops just to the west of the Scilly Islands.
The casual user could easily get the impression that much of the Republic of
Ireland and its coastal waters will not be affected, which is most certainly
not what is expected.

Of course, I appreciate that the warning area shown on the map is intended to
delineate only those land areas of the UK that come within the warning area.
That being the case, why not just colour those areas and omit any reference to
the sea? In this instance, the end product would look rather less dramatic.

--
Norman Lynagh
Tideswell, Derbyshire
303m a.s.l.
https://peakdistrictweather.org
Twitter: @TideswellWeathr

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Old October 12th 17, 04:42 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

On 12 Oct 2017 15:29:52 GMT
"Norman Lynagh" wrote:

To the casual viewer, the map recently issued by the Met Office showing the
yellow warning area for wind on Monday could be very misleading. It appears to
show that the area affected is only a narrow swathe extending northwards from
Cornwall through the Irish Sea to western Scotland. The area includes
extensive areas of sea, including Republic of Ireland territorial waters in
the Irish Sea but excludes much of the Celtic Sea. Some land areas in the
Republic of Ireland are included. The warning area stops just to the west of
the Scilly Islands. The casual user could easily get the impression that much
of the Republic of Ireland and its coastal waters will not be affected, which
is most certainly not what is expected.

Of course, I appreciate that the warning area shown on the map is intended to
delineate only those land areas of the UK that come within the warning area.
That being the case, why not just colour those areas and omit any reference to
the sea? In this instance, the end product would look rather less dramatic.


But it would take longer to prepare as I do not think the software has a sea
mask. Easier to just get a pen and draw freehand.

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Old October 12th 17, 05:22 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

Norman/Will

It's because the Met Office stubbornly refuse to adopt a pure GIS solution for their NSWWS. Selecting single or multiple regional area or postcode areas would be a breeze using GIS, and just as quick as doing it by hand.

There would be no reason why they couldn't liaise with Met √Čireann as they do now with the naming of storms so that the UK and Ireland would issue advanced warnings like this together.

At times when a free hand area is drawn and it just slightly clips the edge of a neighbouring region that fires off a yellow alert for the entire region area which is crazy.

As an example of how it could work, take a look at how the NWS use it for warnings in the United States:

http://www.weather.gov/

If both countries adopted a joint solution like this, there would be no confusion at all and the end of yellow custard blobs.

I did mention this at the time to the project manager.

Bruce.

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Old October 12th 17, 05:37 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

On Thu, 12 Oct 2017 09:22:51 -0700 (PDT)
wrote:

Norman/Will

It's because the Met Office stubbornly refuse to adopt a pure GIS solution
for their NSWWS. Selecting single or multiple regional area or postcode areas
would be a breeze using GIS, and just as quick as doing it by hand.

There would be no reason why they couldn't liaise with Met …ireann as they do
now with the naming of storms so that the UK and Ireland would issue advanced
warnings like this together.

At times when a free hand area is drawn and it just slightly clips the edge
of a neighbouring region that fires off a yellow alert for the entire region
area which is crazy.

As an example of how it could work, take a look at how the NWS use it for
warnings in the United States:

http://www.weather.gov/

If both countries adopted a joint solution like this, there would be no
confusion at all and the end of yellow custard blobs.

I did mention this at the time to the project manager.


Good for you Bruce. Knowing how the MetO works I suspect the PM just
acknowledged the suggestion and then duly ignored it. Once they get set on a
route then it is very hard to change their minds. And then they go on about how
innovative they are, yeah right Joe.

Custard, tangerine juice and red blood is here to stay!
The dinosaur has roared.

Will
--


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Old October 12th 17, 06:24 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

wrote:

Norman/Will

It's because the Met Office stubbornly refuse to adopt a pure GIS solution
for their NSWWS. Selecting single or multiple regional area or postcode areas
would be a breeze using GIS, and just as quick as doing it by hand.

There would be no reason why they couldn't liaise with Met √Čireann as they
do now with the naming of storms so that the UK and Ireland would issue
advanced warnings like this together.

At times when a free hand area is drawn and it just slightly clips the edge
of a neighbouring region that fires off a yellow alert for the entire region
area which is crazy.

As an example of how it could work, take a look at how the NWS use it for
warnings in the United States:

http://www.weather.gov/

If both countries adopted a joint solution like this, there would be no
confusion at all and the end of yellow custard blobs.

I did mention this at the time to the project manager.

Bruce.


Well said, Bruce. The Severe Weather Warning Service could do with a complete
re-hash, carried out by people who have an understanding of the information
that is intended to be conveyed. The current NSWWS is not fit for purpose IMHO.

--
Norman Lynagh
Tideswell, Derbyshire
303m a.s.l.
https://peakdistrictweather.org
Twitter: @TideswellWeathr


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Old October 12th 17, 07:22 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

On 12/10/2017 17:22, wrote:
Norman/Will

It's because the Met Office stubbornly refuse to adopt a pure GIS solution for their NSWWS. Selecting single or multiple regional area or postcode areas would be a breeze using GIS, and just as quick as doing it by hand.

There would be no reason why they couldn't liaise with Met √Čireann as they do now with the naming of storms so that the UK and Ireland would issue advanced warnings like this together.

At times when a free hand area is drawn and it just slightly clips the edge of a neighbouring region that fires off a yellow alert for the entire region area which is crazy.

As an example of how it could work, take a look at how the NWS use it for warnings in the United States:

http://www.weather.gov/

If both countries adopted a joint solution like this, there would be no confusion at all and the end of yellow custard blobs.

I did mention this at the time to the project manager.

Bruce.

They would have to include the Isle of Man as well, as that's not part
of the UK (or the Met Office) - note it's dark grey to show it's not
included. They don't have a warning out yet.

Norman - Isles of Scilly please, before someone from there visits you in
the night!
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Old October 12th 17, 07:35 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

Malcolm Brooks wrote:

On 12/10/2017 17:22, wrote:
Norman/Will

It's because the Met Office stubbornly refuse to adopt a pure GIS solution
for their NSWWS. Selecting single or multiple regional area or postcode
areas would be a breeze using GIS, and just as quick as doing it by hand.

There would be no reason why they couldn't liaise with Met √Čireann as they
do now with the naming of storms so that the UK and Ireland would issue
advanced warnings like this together.

At times when a free hand area is drawn and it just slightly clips the edge
of a neighbouring region that fires off a yellow alert for the entire
region area which is crazy.

As an example of how it could work, take a look at how the NWS use it for
warnings in the United States:

http://www.weather.gov/

If both countries adopted a joint solution like this, there would be no
confusion at all and the end of yellow custard blobs.

I did mention this at the time to the project manager.

Bruce.

They would have to include the Isle of Man as well, as that's not part of the
UK (or the Met Office) - note it's dark grey to show it's not included. They
don't have a warning out yet.



But the Isle of Man is included in the Met Office's yellow blob.


Norman - Isles of Scilly please, before someone from there visits you in the
night!


My humble apologies to all in that part of the world!

--
Norman Lynagh
Tideswell, Derbyshire
303m a.s.l.
https://peakdistrictweather.org
Twitter: @TideswellWeathr
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Old October 12th 17, 11:32 PM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

On 12 Oct 2017 17:24:21 GMT
"Norman Lynagh" wrote:

wrote:

Norman/Will

It's because the Met Office stubbornly refuse to adopt a pure GIS solution
for their NSWWS. Selecting single or multiple regional area or postcode
areas would be a breeze using GIS, and just as quick as doing it by hand.

There would be no reason why they couldn't liaise with Met …ireann as they
do now with the naming of storms so that the UK and Ireland would issue
advanced warnings like this together.

At times when a free hand area is drawn and it just slightly clips the edge
of a neighbouring region that fires off a yellow alert for the entire region
area which is crazy.

As an example of how it could work, take a look at how the NWS use it for
warnings in the United States:

http://www.weather.gov/

If both countries adopted a joint solution like this, there would be no
confusion at all and the end of yellow custard blobs.

I did mention this at the time to the project manager.

Bruce.


Well said, Bruce. The Severe Weather Warning Service could do with a complete
re-hash, carried out by people who have an understanding of the information
that is intended to be conveyed. The current NSWWS is not fit for purpose
IMHO.


As you keep saying :-)
Perhaps we should hand it all over to Meteo Gripe? :-)


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Old October 13th 17, 07:56 AM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

On 12/10/2017 16:29, Norman Lynagh wrote:

To the casual viewer, the map recently issued by the Met Office showing the
yellow warning area for wind on Monday could be very misleading. It appears to
show that the area affected is only a narrow swathe extending northwards from
Cornwall through the Irish Sea to western Scotland. The area includes extensive
areas of sea, including Republic of Ireland territorial waters in the Irish Sea
but excludes much of the Celtic Sea. Some land areas in the Republic of Ireland
are included. The warning area stops just to the west of the Scilly Islands.
The casual user could easily get the impression that much of the Republic of
Ireland and its coastal waters will not be affected, which is most certainly
not what is expected.


What's 'yellow wind' anyway - at least we can visualise 'yellow snow'...


--

Paul Hyett, Cheltenham
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Old October 13th 17, 10:25 AM posted to uk.sci.weather
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Default Yellow wind warning

In message , Vidcapper
writes
What's 'yellow wind' anyway - at least we can visualise 'yellow snow'...


It sounds rather lavatorial.
--
John Hall
"Three o'clock is always too late or too early
for anything you want to do."
Jean-Paul Sartre (1905-1980)


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