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Old December 16th 16, 12:07 AM posted to sci.geo.meteorology
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Default November 2016 National Storm Summary

NATIONAL STORM SUMMARY

NOVEMBER 2016

1-5: Stormy weather impacted states stretching from the southern Plains to the Midwest on Wednesday, while wet weather continued across the Northwest. A cold frontal boundary extended southwestward from Quebec to the southern high Plains. Showers and thunderstorms fired up along and near this frontal boundary across the southern Rockies, the southern Plains, the central Plains, the middle Mississippi Valley, the Midwest and the Great Lakes. Flood warnings were issued for eastern Iowa on Wednesday. Cedar Rapids, Iowa., reported a midday total of 1.12 inches of rain. Lansing, Mich., reported a midday total of 1.09 inches of rain. Meanwhile, a cold frontal boundary approached the Northwest. Moderate rain and high elevation snow developed ahead of this frontal boundary over northwest Oregon and Washington. Quillayute, Wash., reported a midday total of 1.51 inches of rain. Shelton, Wash., reported a midday total of 0.45 of an inch of rain.

A cluster of storms impacted the Four Corners on Friday, while temperatures spiked above normal across parts of the Plains and the Mississippi Valley. An area of low pressure rotated over the Four Corners. This system drew moisture from the Gulf of Mexico, which lead to the development of rain and thunderstorms across the region. A severe thunderstorm warning was issued for southeast Arizona, while flash flood warnings were issued in southwest New Mexico. Truth Or Consequences, N.M., reported a midday total of 1.60 inches of rain. Socorro, N.M., reported a midday total of 1.13 inches of rain. Just to the east, a cold frontal boundary extended southwestward from the western Atlantic to the western Gulf Coast. Showers and isolated storms fired up along and near this frontal boundary across parts of the southern Mid-Atlantic, the Southeast and the Gulf Coast. Edenton, N.C., reported a midday total of 0.69 of an inch of rain. Oceana Naval Air Station, Va., reported a midday total of 0.68 of an inch of rain. A light mixture of rain and snow lingered over portions of northern Maine.

6-12: Active weather affected the Plains and the Mississippi Valley on Monday, while scattered showers developed in the Northwest. A wave of low pressure transitioned eastward over the central Plains. This area of low pressure interacted with a warm and humid air mass streaming northward from the Gulf of Mexico. This interaction resulted in rain and thunderstorms across the southern Plains, the central Plains, the western edge of the Midwest and the lower Mississippi Valley. Locally heavy rain impacted the western Gulf Coast. Gulfport, Miss., reported a midday total of 1.77 inches of rain. Beaumont, Texas, reported a midday total of 1.49 inches of rain. Temperatures spiked 10 to 25 degrees above normal across the upper Midwest on Monday.

A cold frontal boundary brought wet weather to the East Coast on Wednesday, while a weaker frontal boundary moved over the Northwest. A cold frontal boundary extended south southwestward over the coast of New England, the Mid-Atlantic and the Deep South. This frontal boundary generated light to moderate rain from the Northeast to the Gulf Coast. Morgantown, W. Va., reported a midday total of 0.48 of an inch of rain. Altoona, Pa., reported a midday total of 0.45 of an inch of rain. Some precipitation fell in the form of snow across the higher elevations of the northern Appalachians. Cold and dry air trailed this frontal boundary over the upper Midwest and the Northeast. Meanwhile, an area of low pressure centered over northern Mexico stirred up showers and thunderstorms across the southern Plains and the western Gulf Coast. Kerrville, Texas, reported a midday total of 0.90 of an inch of rain. Horseshoe Bay, Texas, reported a midday total of 0.77 of an inch of rain. Out west, a weak cold frontal boundary produced light to moderate rain in western Washington. Quillayute, Wash., reported a midday total of 0.53 of an inch of rain.

13-19: A low pressure system ushered rain over the Mid-Atlantic on Monday, while a cold frontal boundary moved across the Northwest. A low pressure system strengthened as it moved north northeastward over the southern Mid-Atlantic. This system ushered light to moderate rain and isolated thunderstorms across the Mid-Atlantic and the central Appalachians on Monday. Hatteras, N.C., reported a midday total of 0.81 of an inch of rain. Wilmington, N.C., reported a midday total of 0.62 of an inch of rain. A weak frontal boundary associated with this system extended southwestward over the Florida Peninsula and the Gulf of Mexico. This frontal boundary continued to produce showers and thunderstorms in Florida and along the southern tip of Texas. Meanwhile, a cold frontal boundary extended southwestward from the upper Intermountain West to the coast of Oregon. This system brought periods of moderate rain and high elevation snow to the upper Intermountain West, the Pacific Northwest and the northern edge of California. Newport Airport, Ore., reported a midday total of 1.15 inches of rain. Stampede Pass, Wash., reported a midday total of 0.95 of an inch of rain.

Wet weather affected the Northeast on Wednesday, while a trough of low pressure brought a pattern change to the West Coast. A low pressure system shifted north northeastward across the coast of New England. This system ushered moderate to locally heavy rain over New England on Wednesday. Greenville, Maine, reported a midday total of 1.74 inches of rain. Bangor, Maine reported a midday total of 1.26 inches of rain. Scattered showers also developed along the eastern tier of the Midwest and the northern Mid-Atlantic as a cold frontal boundary moved across the region. High pressure brought above normal temperatures to states stretching from the central Plains to the upper Midwest. Des Moines, Iowa, recorded a midday high of 63 degrees. Meanwhile, a cold frontal boundary extended southwestward from the northern Plains to the Southwest. This frontal boundary generated light to moderate showers and high elevation snow in the northern Plains, the Intermountain West, the northern Great Basin and northern California. Cooke City, Mont., reported a midday high of 3.0 inches of snow. A trough of low pressure moved onshore over the West Coast. Rain and isolated thunderstorms formed along the coasts of Washington, Oregon and northern California. Crescent City, Calif., reported a midday total of 0.54 of an inch of rain. Additionally, gusty winds affected a large portion of the Southwest. Lancaster, Calif., recorded wind gusts of 48 mph.

A low pressure system impacted the central third of the country on Friday, while a wet weather pattern developed along the West Coast. A strong area of low pressure moved northeastward from the central Plains to the upper Midwest. This system ushered moderate to heavy snow across the northern Plains and the upper Midwest. Blizzard warnings remained in effect for eastern South Dakota and many counties across Minnesota. Lake Park, Minn., reported a midday total of 6.3 inches of snow. Tyndall, S.D., reported a midday total of 4.1 inches of snow. Strong winds also impacted a handful of states on Friday. Yankton, S.D., recorded a wind gust of 56 mph. Duluth Sky Harbor, Minn., recorded a wind gust of 55 mph. A cold frontal boundary associated with this system extended south southwestward from the upper Mississippi Valley to the southern Plains. Rain and embedded thunderstorms developed along and ahead of this frontal boundary from the western Great Lakes to the western Gulf Coast. De Queen, Ark., reported a midday total of 1.91 inches of rain. Meanwhile, a cold frontal boundary approached the West Coast. Light to moderate rain and high elevation snow developed across parts of Washington, western Oregon and northwest California.

20-26: A frontal system affected the western half of the country on Monday, while lake effect snow continued in the Northeast. A cold frontal boundary extended south southwestward from the upper Intermountain West to the Southwest. As this frontal boundary transitioned eastward, it generated widespread rain in the Intermountain West, the Great Basin and the Southwest. Los Alamitos, Calif., reported a midday total of 0.72 of an inch of rain. Flagstaff, Ariz., reported a midday total of 0.71 of an inch of rain. High elevation snow also affected many states on Monday. Squaw Valley, Calif., reported a midday total of 6.0 inches snow. Elk Park, Colo., reported a midday total of 8.5 inches of snow. Additionally, an onshore flow from the Pacific kept showery weather in the picture for the coasts of Washington, Oregon and northern California. Just to the east, showers and embedded thunderstorms began to develop from the southern high Plains to the northern Plains. Meanwhile, a frigid air mass swept across the relatively warm waters of the Great Lakes, which resulted in lake effect snow downwind of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie. Lake effect snow warnings were issued for northeast Pennsylvania and New York. Winter storm warnings were also issued Upstate New York and western New England. Macedon, N.Y. reported a midday total of 17.0 inches of snow. Susquehanna, Pa., reported a midday total of 15.2 inches of snow.

A low pressure system impacted the Midwest on Wednesday, while a Pacific system shifted over the Northwest. An area of low pressure moved northeastward across the upper Mississippi Valley. This system ushered a mixture of rain, freezing rain and snow over the upper Midwest and the interior portion of the northern Mid-Atlantic. Winter weather advisories were issued for northeast Minnesota, northern Wisconsin, northwest Michigan, northern Pennsylvania and a large part of New York. North Branch, Minn., reported a midday total of 6.0 inches of snow. Three Lakes, Wis., reported a midday total of 4.4 inches of snow. A cold frontal boundary associated with this system extended south southwestward from the middle Mississippi Valley to the western Gulf Coast. Showers and thunderstorms fired up along and ahead of this frontal boundary from the Midwest to the Gulf Coast. Barksdale Air Force Base, La., reported a midday total of 3.93 inches of rain. Marshall, Texas, reported a midday total of 3.27 inches of rain. Just to the east, scattered snow showers persisted in Upstate New York and northern New England. Meanwhile, a cold frontal boundary shifted over the interior Pacific Northwest, the Great Basin and northern California. Light to moderate rain and high elevation snow developed along and ahead of the frontal boundary across the Great Basin and the Intermountain West. An onshore flow from the Pacific also produced showers and high elevation snow over northern California, western Oregon and western Washington. Kingvale, Calif., reported a midday total of 5.0 inches of snow. Selma, Ore., reported a midday total of 1.33 inches of rain.

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